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Citation: Min Li,  Donglin Shi,  Yanxiu Li,  Yuyi Xiao,  Mianmian Chen,  Liang Chen,  Hong Du,  Wei Zhang. Recombination of T4-like Phages and Its Activity against Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Planktonic and Biofilm Forms [J].VIROLOGICA SINICA.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12250-020-00233-2

Recombination of T4-like Phages and Its Activity against Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Planktonic and Biofilm Forms

  • Corresponding author: Hong Du, hong_du@126.com Wei Zhang, vszw@njau.edu.cn
  • Received Date: 09 October 2019
    Accepted Date: 10 March 2020
    Published Date: 25 May 2020
  • The increasing emergence of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) has become a global concern, primarily due to the limitation of antimicrobial treatment options. Phage therapy has been considered as a promising alternative for treating infections caused by multi-drug resistant E. coli. However, the application of phages as a promising antimicrobial agent is limited by their narrow host range and specificity. In this research, a recombinant T4-like phage, named WGqlae, has been obtained by changing the receptor specificity determinant region of gene 37, using a homologous recombination platform of T4-like phages established by our laboratory previously. The engineered phage WGqlae can lyse four additional hosts, comparing to its parental phages WG01 and QL01. WGqlae showed similar characteristics, including thermo and pH stability, optimal multiplicity of infection and one-step growth curve, to the donor phage QL01. In addition, sequencing results showed that gene 37 of recombinant phage WGqlae had genetically stable even after 20 generations. In planktonic test, phage WGqlae had significant antimicrobial effects on E. coli DE192 and DE205B. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of E. coli in phage WGqlae treating group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01). Besides, phage WGqlae demonstrated an obvious inhibitory effect on the biofilm formation and the clearance of mature biofilms. Our study suggested that engineered phages may be promising candidates for future phage therapy applications against pathogenic E. coli in planktonic and biofilm forms.

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    Recombination of T4-like Phages and Its Activity against Pathogenic Escherichia coli in Planktonic and Biofilm Forms

      Corresponding author: Hong Du, hong_du@126.com
      Corresponding author: Wei Zhang, vszw@njau.edu.cn
    • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
    • 2 Key Laboratory of Animal Bacteriology, Ministry of Agriculture, Nanjing 210095, China
    • 3 MOE Joint International Research Laboratory of Animal Health and Food Safety, College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
    • 4 Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Animal Science and Technology, Zhejiang A&F University, Lin'an, Hangzhou 311300, China
    • 5 Hackensack-Meridian Health Center for Discovery and Innovation, Nutley, NJ 07110, USA
    • 6 Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004, China

    Abstract: The increasing emergence of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) has become a global concern, primarily due to the limitation of antimicrobial treatment options. Phage therapy has been considered as a promising alternative for treating infections caused by multi-drug resistant E. coli. However, the application of phages as a promising antimicrobial agent is limited by their narrow host range and specificity. In this research, a recombinant T4-like phage, named WGqlae, has been obtained by changing the receptor specificity determinant region of gene 37, using a homologous recombination platform of T4-like phages established by our laboratory previously. The engineered phage WGqlae can lyse four additional hosts, comparing to its parental phages WG01 and QL01. WGqlae showed similar characteristics, including thermo and pH stability, optimal multiplicity of infection and one-step growth curve, to the donor phage QL01. In addition, sequencing results showed that gene 37 of recombinant phage WGqlae had genetically stable even after 20 generations. In planktonic test, phage WGqlae had significant antimicrobial effects on E. coli DE192 and DE205B. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of E. coli in phage WGqlae treating group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.01). Besides, phage WGqlae demonstrated an obvious inhibitory effect on the biofilm formation and the clearance of mature biofilms. Our study suggested that engineered phages may be promising candidates for future phage therapy applications against pathogenic E. coli in planktonic and biofilm forms.

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